it’s a rich mans world…

philipwernerfoto:

Danni le Fae by Philip Werner
Projector shoot.
Melbourne. January 2014.

philipwernerfoto:

Danni le Fae by Philip Werner

Projector shoot.

Melbourne. January 2014.

rulingthumb:

Shin Taga - ‘Flying’, 1977

rulingthumb:

Shin Taga - ‘Flying’, 1977

nickkahler:

Salvador Dali, 1937

Untitled (Female Figure With Head of Flowers)

nickkahler:

Salvador Dali, 1937

Untitled (Female Figure With Head of Flowers)

art-porn:

Spencer Tunick

art-porn:

Spencer Tunick

jennifergriffo:

femme fatal.

jennifergriffo:

femme fatal.

danielclandestino:

More amazing calaverita artwork by the talented Jose Pulido.

danielclandestino:

More amazing calaverita artwork by the talented Jose Pulido.

belleandwhistle:

i’m part of a project @raymondjawn is doing and here’s one of the portraits that i liked from it!
i feel hot. so yaaaa~ here’s a gift to y’all~

my baby is so stunningly gorgeous!!!
check out dood’s thesis: http://belleandwhistle.tumblr.com/post/100121763119/raymondjawn-the-thesis-train-is-a-moving-these

belleandwhistle:

i’m part of a project @raymondjawn is doing and here’s one of the portraits that i liked from it!

i feel hot. so yaaaa~ here’s a gift to y’all~

my baby is so stunningly gorgeous!!!

check out dood’s thesis: http://belleandwhistle.tumblr.com/post/100121763119/raymondjawn-the-thesis-train-is-a-moving-these

jourdepluie91:

Armand Rassenfosse (Belgian, 1862-1934), The Death of Lovers (La Mort des amants), 1899

jourdepluie91:

Armand Rassenfosse (Belgian, 1862-1934), The Death of Lovers (La Mort des amants), 1899

vicemag:

A Giant Hole Is Swallowing a Town in Peru
When we arrived in Cerro de Pasco, a medium-size city in the high Peruvian sierra, it was night. We inched through the crowded, twisting streets past a large statue of Daniel Carrión, a legendary medical student who stands there with a syringe in his hand, injecting himself with the disease that’s named in his honor. In the colonial quarter, we abruptly came to a wall, painted alternately with graffiti and the words private property. I could sense a great emptiness on the other side, like when you’re by the ocean but cannot quite see it.
I climbed a rock and peeked over. All around in the distance the city was aglow. Plunging out before me was the hole, void of light but for the tiny headlights of trucks crawling around its sides. This is El Tajo: the Pit.
In Andean cosmology, Earth is Pachamama—Mother Earth—and this massive polymetal mine is the locus of a literal penetration. It is 1.2 miles wide and as deep as the Empire State Building is tall. All day and all night, the rock-grinding machinery produces a low mechanical groan, which is amplified tremendously by the pit’s speaker-like shape. It is the sound of the city being eaten alive.

Photo by the author.
Cerro de Pasco is an environmental and urban catastrophe. The pit, which opened in 1956, is in the middle of the city—not beside it but in it. As it grows, thousands of families have had to move into unplanned urban developments, most of which lack basic sanitation. Now the city is running out of space. In 2008, Peru’s congress passed Law No. 29293, calling for the resettlement of the entire population of 67,000. But the law has gone unheeded.
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vicemag:

A Giant Hole Is Swallowing a Town in Peru

When we arrived in Cerro de Pasco, a medium-size city in the high Peruvian sierra, it was night. We inched through the crowded, twisting streets past a large statue of Daniel Carrión, a legendary medical student who stands there with a syringe in his hand, injecting himself with the disease that’s named in his honor. In the colonial quarter, we abruptly came to a wall, painted alternately with graffiti and the words private property. I could sense a great emptiness on the other side, like when you’re by the ocean but cannot quite see it.

I climbed a rock and peeked over. All around in the distance the city was aglow. Plunging out before me was the hole, void of light but for the tiny headlights of trucks crawling around its sides. This is El Tajo: the Pit.

In Andean cosmology, Earth is Pachamama—Mother Earth—and this massive polymetal mine is the locus of a literal penetration. It is 1.2 miles wide and as deep as the Empire State Building is tall. All day and all night, the rock-grinding machinery produces a low mechanical groan, which is amplified tremendously by the pit’s speaker-like shape. It is the sound of the city being eaten alive.

Photo by the author.

Cerro de Pasco is an environmental and urban catastrophe. The pit, which opened in 1956, is in the middle of the city—not beside it but in it. As it grows, thousands of families have had to move into unplanned urban developments, most of which lack basic sanitation. Now the city is running out of space. In 2008, Peru’s congress passed Law No. 29293, calling for the resettlement of the entire population of 67,000. But the law has gone unheeded.

continue